The Méndez Morato alley or the stairs of the Tezontle hill.

From Cerro del Tezontle you can see the beauty of the Tulancingo Valley. The hill of the tezontle is a geographical reference in our city. Since the pre-Hispanic period its skirts were inhabited. In the colonial period, the people of the original towns were forced to live on steep streets that they themselves paved. At the time of independence, Osorno and Bravo attacked the city from the top of the Tezontle hill, then uninhabited and without the great sinkhole that we know today. The same thing happened during the Revolution, due to the strategic importance of this place.
The hole that the hill has was the product of the exploitation of the tezontle that occurred since pre-Hispanic times. Said tezontle has been used since then both to cover buildings and to make the floors of that time. During the Colony it was used to build houses and buildings such as our beautiful Cathedral, even on the hill there are houses excavated in the same tezontle that are preserved to date. It was also used for the construction of the Mexico-Tuxpan highway. The characteristic red color of the buildings in our city is because they are made with the tezontle from the hill on which we live.
The tunnel housed the Tulancingo fair in 1962 to celebrate the first centenary of the Diocese of Tulancingo and since the 90’s the Tulantianguis.
But that sinkhole makes communication between the valley and the top difficult. For this reason, at the beginning of the 20th century, Mr. Manuel Méndez Morato donated the passage between Hidalgo street and the extension of Aldama, so that the people of Tulancinguense could go up to the upper neighborhoods of the city more quickly. He donated it and also made steps with the same tezontle. Don Manuel, born in 1867, was an industrious Tulancinguense who dedicated himself to making shoes and his butcher shop in the municipal market.
In the 80s and 90s, this alley and its surroundings were devastated by gangs such as “los locos del tanque*,” Los nahuales de la Francisco I. Madero, the “banda del gato negro”, “los sacks”, “los naughty”, “vampires”, etc. Those gangs began to make those spaces unsafe places. Even so, we Tulancinguenses feel a special affection for that place, so much so that we have given it a nickname: Las escaleritas del cerro del tezontle, giving it a diminutive suffix, which implies our implicit affection.
In 1993 the stairs were renovated, giving them their current appearance. And it is in 2022 when MUTU, together with the municipal administration headed by Mr. Jorge Márquez Alvarado and other sponsors involved, decided to include this alley so dear to Tulancinguenses as a renovated space, full of light and embellished by murals alluding to culture. mexican. As a detail, the figure of the feathered serpent descends the stairs, giving Quetzalcóatl, a mythical character who inhabited Tulancingo for 4 years, a prominent place.
MUTU is made up of talented and restless young people from Tulancingo who have painted more than 50 murals and works of urban art. With 22 murals completed in the Méndez Morato alley alone, the idea is to continue this waste of art to the municipal zoo and thus offer an alternative to tourism while working on the appropriation of public spaces and fostering the sense of identity of the neighbors.

CLARIFICATION
The opinion expressed in this column is the responsibility of its author (a) and does not necessarily represent the position of AM Hidalgo

The Méndez Morato alley or the stairs of the Tezontle hill.